Tips for staying healthy this fall!

Prevention is always best! Keep your lungs nourished and enjoy lots of pears.

Pears help moisturize dry skin and improve slow digestion. If you are coming down with a cough, add some honey to a baked pear to clear the cough and soothe your throat. Try this simple and delicious recipe: BAKED PEARS.

Traditional Chinese Medicine believes that “Wind is the mother of 1,000 diseases.”  Be sure to keep your neck protected!! If you come down with a cold notice if you’re feeling feverish and have a burning throat, or if you’re achey and have a headache.

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If you’re cold/flu has you feeling hot, eat cooling and heat-clearing foods like fresh fruits and vegetables: cabbage, dandelion, mint, chrysanthemum flowers, apples, and pears. Drink plenty of room temperature water or tea.

If your cold/flu has you feeling achey and chilled, eat warming foods that encourage perspiration. These include ginger, garlic, mustard greens and seeds, parsnips, scallions, basil, and cinnamon. Drink plenty of warm fluids such as soups and tea.

Finally, consider scheduling an acupuncture and/or moxibustion treatment at Royal Road Clinic! We can focus on warming and boosting your immunity. Learn more about Moxibustion HERE.

 

Sick Care vs. Wellness Care: A Shift in How We Understand Health Care

Image result for wellnessThe mainstream medical system tends to support the idea that you only need to go to the doctor when you’re already sick. Think of this as a sick care model of treatment. It’s a good thing modern medicine has given us powerful treatments for sickness, but you don’t need to wait until you’re sick to receive care. Wellness care, on the other hand, is the model of medicine that promotes well-being through preventative care and on-going maintenance check-ups. Traditional Chinese Medicine and acupuncture are paradigmatic examples of the wellness care philosophy.

When I treat patients with Traditional Chinese Medicine and acupuncture, they often ask how quickly they will feel better. The number of treatments will depend on how chronic or acute the case may be and how quickly the body reacts to the treatments. Most people tend to see positive results within three or four treatments. What I also like to encourage patients to consider, however, is coming in to see me before they start feeling sick, or before the symptoms become burdensome.

Shifting our perspective to a wellness model encourages us to play the long game. You should invest in your wellness before you get sick in order to prevent sickness. Some ways to invest in your health include:

  • eating a whole foods and, as much as possible, plant-based diet,
  • moving your body regularly (whether that means going to the gym, a yoga class, or for a walk around the block– it doesn’t matter, just move!)
  • visiting your acupuncturist for maintenance check-ups one to two times per season to help ward off imbalances that lead to illness.Value your health before sickness comes!

Support through the Fall to prepare for the Winter.

Traditional Chinese Medicine is a two thousand year old medicine that looks to nature as its teacher. In the Fall, imagine the leaves changing colors, falling from trees, and eventually drying. Like fragile leaves, our Lungs are most susceptible to the wind and dryness in the Fall. Acupuncture and other Traditional Chinese Medicine modalities help prepare Lungs for the cold winter months ahead. Fall is also the time to harvest, a time when nature transforms and transitions towards an ending. In Fall, nature shifts from activity to rest, letting the the earth lie fallow through the winter.

Just as the seasons cycle, so do our energies, emotions and bodies. Fall and the Lungs are also associated with grief and with letting go. It’s not unusual to feel these shifts emotionally or physically. Old pains (physical or emotional) might reemerge and ache with the appearance of gusting cold winds rustling them from their trees.

 

 

Ancient wisdom teaches us not to avoid, but to lean in and listen to what the season is teaching us. This season ask yourself:

  • Is it time to slow down & reap my harvest?
  • Do I really want to resort to allergy meds that make me drowsy or should I try a natural alternative?
  • Are old injuries reappearing and aching suddenly?
  • Do I have something that I need to let go?
  • Am I grieving and need support along the way?
  • Am I prepared to slow down and turn inward?